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2015 Horrible Imaginings 1st Annual Horror For Humanity Showcase: Forgiving Sky!

sky

Country of Origin: Myanmar

Six people are trapped in a ruined building, surrounded by a group of hostile people. With their food supplies dwindling and their hope for an escape waning, they must come up with a desperate measure to survive while holding onto what little human dignity that is left in them.

"Often I hear how people reject the horror genre because there is already 'so much horror in the world,' or 'if I want horror I will just watch the news.' Those statements fail to take into account the concept that filmmaking is an art that can exist to help us discuss and begin to deal with real-world horrors. The news is meant to inform, but it does little to react to real-world issues on a more personal level. That's what film is for. Horrible Imaginings is proud to announce the start of a new endeavor we are calling "Horror for Humanity": an initiative to showcase, and eventually help fund, different films that choose to look at some of the darkness of existence and channel that darkness through creative expression. Thank you for joining me in expanding what we can do with genre cinema!"

-Miguel Rodriguez, director of the Horrible Imaginings Film Fesitval

"Forgiving Sky" will be featured during the "Horror for Humanity" Short Film Block, starting at 4:45pm on Saturday, September 12th!

Part of Horrible Imaginings Horror Film Festival of San Diego's full line-up! Get Full Festival Passes or single screening tickets HERE!

myat noe

Director Bio: Myat Noe

Noe's early interest was in the Theatre and he later switched his focus of studies to World Film Studies, Film Theories, Criticism and Screenplay. He lives in Yangon, Myanmar and is a translator/interpreter at Human Rights Human Dignity International Film Festival, which is part of Human Rights Films Network.

Director’s Statement

The story and plot for “Forgiving Sky” is inspired by a true story from Central African Republic that happened a few months ago. When faced with a desperate and relentlessly inhuman situation, how long can we hold on to our humanities and our collective dignity as humans? This is a question I want to impose upon the audience with this film and the answer still eludes me to this day.